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Top Hashtags for Cosmetics Companies in 2019

Social media marketing is crucial for cosmetics companies to master, and they know it. As a result, we see tons of meaningful online activity in the category, particularly posts using #hashtags.

So, what are the top hashtags for Cosmetics Companies in 2019? Let’s check them out, along with other social analytics insight, to see what they reveal about the industry, consumer expectations and potential marketing tactics!

top hashtags for Cosmetics Companies

With more than 67 million posts about cosmetics so far in 2019, it’s interesting to note how massive some of the top hashtags have become. And to clarify, these hashtags were found running a search on items that contained ‘cosmetics, beauty and beauty trends’ and their corresponding hashtags as primary terms:

primary terms used in top cosmetics hashtags search

In NetBase, brands can search for specific terms or keywords and also exclude those they find to be irrelevant using the “Tuner:”

filtering in and out specific terms from search results

This ability is super important to have. There are always loosely associated conversations happening that aren’t necessarily relevant to a brand’s research. We’ll share an example of that soon! Being able to explore how those conversations look beyond the term itself before making a decision to include or exclude something is key.

Take #fashion, for example – with more than a million posts mentioning fashion as part of the beauty and cosmetics conversation, we can explore it in a variety of ways to see what’s happening there and how the conversation is relevant.

Fashion Figures Prominently in Cosmetics Conversations

When exploring the real-time stream of cosmetics posts mentioning #fashion, we see some promotions, as well as potential influencers sharing their top beauty picks:

potential influencers sharing their top beauty picks

#Fashion posts are often just that – focused on consumers’ loves and hates around not just clothing, but every bit of what makes a person feel fashionable and beautiful. Cosmetics are an important piece of that conversation for many.

But it’s a huge volume of posts to sort through. This makes top hashtag mentions both good and bad for brands to add to their marketing toolbox. These super popular hashtags are great to be aware of, crucial to be aware of really, and best used for capturing category insight. They really shouldn’t be mucking up a brand’s marketing mojo though. And they do.

How Brands Misuse Hashtags

The recognition of using hashtags and the fact that consumers are increasingly hip to sorting mentions by them, leads to overuse of the top terms we see. Brands that are super active on social and have equally active and engaged followers who share and interact with their content regularly, may enhance brand awareness using super generic and popular hashtags. Or they may turn off potential consumers.

And what of the lesser known brands? Are these top hashtags working well for them, or giving them a false sense of online success? They would be better off using more niche hashtags that are resonating with their audiences.

“Most often, the narrower the scope of the hashtag, the more engaged the users are. When Instagram hashtags are overused, they can be confusing and frustrating and take away from your story. However, when used properly, hashtags are a great way for individuals and brands to increase their posts visibility and engagement.”

And one hashtag that immediately comes to mind here (and is on our Word Cloud above) is “natural beauty.”

Keeping the Cosmetics Convo Natural

The “natural beauty” conversation shows us that cosmetics brands have a huge, untapped market available to them if they can focus on enhancing natural beauty instead of covering it up.

natural beauty market comes up in top hashtags for cosmetics

And capturing and analyzing relevant niche markets – particularly growing niche markets (like ‘natural beauty’), offers other benefits as well. It helps brands better understand the lives of segments discussing narrowly focused needs. And it also helps brands create more robust criteria for their influencer identification process. We’ll speak to that a bit more in a moment.

Coming at all of this from another path (and there are many), we can dig deeper into the demographics of the Cosmetics segments’ more general interests and get specific. Really specific.

By filtering by those mentioning “beauty,” we see some relevant adjacencies to “natural beauty” emerging. A top interest of consumers in this segmented search, for example, includes “green living:”

using demographics to explore interests of cosmetics crowd

Could there be a way to combine green living with natural beauty and target consumers using these hashtags online? Certainly! And as we speak to in the next section, they already are!

Another interesting – and unexpected adjacency that pops out here is “automotive.” Car cosmetics!

Car cosmetics are mentioned often

So, before a mascara brand rushes out to partner with a car company, it’s good to be able to perform some due diligence and see if the sentiment actually speaks to that need. Here, it does not. Though it is an interesting potential angle to pursue for luxury cosmetics providers. We’ll leave you to further explore that angle as “luxury” often comes up in associated conversations here.

Many of the brands listed in People’s Best New Beauty Products of 2019 have obviously done their social listening research, by the way. Let’s take a quick detour and look.

Making Beauty Products That Pop

It’s interesting (though not at all surprising) to note how well top beauty products line up with our discoveries:

Superflower is “clean” brand offering a daily, do-it-all serum with CBD. Its focus is on “natural beauty,” skincare,” “health,” and “lifestyle.” It’s firing on all pistons and is destine to be a hit with its audience.

Another “natural beauty” solution comes from the folks at Mary Kay. Its green and purifying, Mary Kay Naturally “skincare” line is super clean, offering an ingredient list for consumers to review ahead of buying (as does Superflower).

And then “cruelty free” was another top term we uncovered, and speak to pretty extensively in our latest Global Beauty Report. We see that concept represented in People’s top brands compilation as well: Victoria Beckham’s newly released line is cruelty-free and uses “clean” ingredients. And is said to offer a nod to sustainability, with orders delivered in a reusable canvas pouch.

But even with the right marketing, packaging and informed consumer understanding, having the right folks sharing a cosmetics brands’ products provides the boost many brands need to break through the online noise. And yes, we mean influencers. And not just any influencers!

Cosmetics Aren’t Selling Themselves

Although it can seem like the market is over-saturated with influencers some days, it really is not. Not with actually influential folks who can help a brand reach key segments, that is. There is an overabundance of inflaters online though, unfortunately. Distinguishing between the two is important. A few tips:

  • Their follower numbers are astronomical – almost too good to be true
  • They share lots of random, “sponsored” tweets on their streams
  • Follower engagement is rare and appears . . . off

We explore each of the bullets above in further detail in our post on the topic – 7 Ways To Differentiate Influencers From Inflaters. Be sure to check it out!

Influencer marketing is super beneficial to brands of any size, once you find folks relevant to your cause. And we’re pretty great at helping brands find these precise professionals! Reach out and we’ll show you how to find amazing micro and mega-influencers to enhance brand awareness. And we’ll help you sort out those niche areas relevant to your brand to pursue too!

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