elearning solutions from the arts

What can companies learn from the eLearning challenges that homebound families are facing? Smart brands can use this information to offer solutions and build their consumer base.

With schools around the country closed due to Coronavirus, many institutions are handling the pandemic by turning to elearning or offering a break. While parents, concerned about their children’s education, attempt to grapple with tests, attendance requirements, graduation, and college, the Arts and other educational institutions are stepping up and offering free learning options for parents.

eLearning for Everyone

Using Quid’s data visualization, we get a snapshot of the overall conversation around the Coronavirus and education.

elearning-and-covid

We can quickly see that families are not only concerned with school closings, but how to homeschool, talk to their kids about COVID, and online learning. Overwhelmed with lockdowns, working from home, the economy, and the education of their children, parents are eager to take advantage of available learning resources, and many educational and artistic organizations are happy to deliver.

And brands that want to succeed are in a prime position to piggy-back this trend.

What Brands Can Learn from the Arts

There are lots of lessons brands can learn from the arts – and three immediately jump out as relevant:

1. Give Like Crazy

Missed field trips, labs, and hands-on learning have given organizations like the Metropolitan Opera and NASA a chance to give back to the community, while broadening their patronship and providing educational opportunities to millions of families.

The Metropolitan Opera, closed for the duration of the epidemic, is streaming performances of its award-winning season on its website nightly.

metropolitan-opera-offering-elearning-options

NASA is posting free STEM tutorials and activities for students, using products found at home. Families can make edible space crafts, play games, and even build and launch their own rockets.

Brand takeaway: Knowing consumer concerns and fears, brands can pivot to offer ways to help families stay healthy and productive.

Simple Habit is offering free meditation, sleep, and therapy services through the end of April. And Fast food giant Burger King announced that starting Monday, March 23, it will be giving away free kids’ meals with the purchase of an adult meal, to help keep children fed during the Coronavirus crisis.

simple-habit-and-BK-reaching-out-to-struggling-consumers-to-offer-support

2. Stay In Touch.

As many people worldwide are isolated in their homes for the next few weeks, the bombardment of posts and articles in newsfeeds can be overwhelming. The need to emotionally connect via social media is more vital now than ever though, particularly as we can see there is mixed sentiment when it comes to the challenges homebound families are facing:

consumer-sentiment-around-homeschooling

The Arts naturally seek to find value in human sentiment and reflect the social climate. Organizations are reaching for the hearts of families by empathizing, encouraging and empowering. Using Facebook, Twitter and Instagram to engage with patrons, they’re offering virtual performances and lessons to inspire a sense of community. These companies are making personal and meaningful connections.

Broadway.com is actively engaging with its fanbase, encouraging them to stay strong and finding a way to balance a set of normalcy in these trying times. And CFCArts is using its influence to reach its students and families with online rehearsals and encore performances.

broadway-shows-via-online-to-support-elearning-efforts

Brand Takeway: Consumers appreciate a positive touch to distract them from serious stresses right now. Brands can offer than in a variety of ways, by not selling but interacting.

In general, brands need to be proactive about consistently reaching for the heart before asking for the hand or wallet – and this is very true right now.  Consumers are looking for reassurance and relevancy, not aggressive sales pitches and marketing.

yogaworks-and-starbucks-shining-light-on-positivity-online

3. It’s Not About the Money

As the flailing economy looms over our heads, families around the world are facing tough financial decisions. Parents especially feel the burden when it comes to extracurricular activities for their school age children.

Although museums and theaters have closed their doors and are facing economic uncertainties themselves, many of these organizations are giving up profits to instill a love of arts and culture to those young and old.

J Paul Getty Museum – The Getty, along with close to 2,500 other museums around the world, is offering free virtual tours of several of its exhibits and encouraging families to recreate their favorite paintings. And Thrive Art School is offering budding young artists free online classes on YouTube.

art-classes-for-kids-as-an-extracurricular-activity

Brand Takeaway: Smart brands are finding ways to build clientele and interest by offering free and reduced activities and services.

Fender Guitars is offering three months of free online guitar, bass, and ukulele lessons for 100,000   players. And streaming services like Netflix, Hulu, RightNow Media and Disney are offering free trials, some lasting up to 30 days. YouTube Premium has also released all of the videos in the Schoolhouse Rocks! Collection.

Generating Long-term Love

Brands that can not only endear themselves to consumers but come beside them and offer assistance during this time will certainly be better off once the economy begins to stabilize. And companies are certainly thinking outside the box as the days and weeks grow longer.

As we can see from the snapshot below, mental and physical health are top concerns around the globe. Companies able to combat evolving challenges with new marketing strategies must stay on top of the global conversation.

top-elearning-and-covid

And speaking to those health concerns, gyms and personal trainers are offering online workout routines, ranging from Yoga, Zumba, CrossFit and everything in between. And food delivery services, like Postmates, are offering to pick up alcohol and groceries, in addition to your restaurant order. For some, that’s mental health care in itself!

fitness-and-food-delivery-tops-consumers-concerns-as-well

It’s all about understanding what your specific consumers are needing and finding a way to support it. Mind and body educational pursuits are just one avenue, but an important one that brands mustn’t ignore. Utilizing consumer and market intelligence tools, companies will stay on top of consumer sentiment and analyze trends to keep them one step ahead of this virus – as that’s everyone’s competition right now.

We are living in unprecedented times. Brands have to be smart in their approach with consumers or face losing more than just profit. Reach out and we’ll show you how to unlock the market intelligence your brand needs to survive.