Social Sentiment Foreshadowing Super Bowl Commercials

Super Bowl commercials have turned into mini-cinematic events over the years, and 2020 is proving no different. How are commercials shaping up according to social sentiment, and does the online reaction bode well for these brands? Let’s take a look at what is resonating and why, to find out!

Super Bowl Commercial Mentions

As the big day approaches, commercial “leaks” are everywhere and the buzz of online. By monitoring mentions, we can see the Super Bowl commercial mentions offering an ebb and flow of excitement:

Super Bowl commercial mentions offering an ebb and flow of excitement

There was a spike in relevant mentions on January 23. This is something we can examine easily in NetBase Quid, as our insight is not only best-in-class accurate, but super transparent as well (unlike some other folks):

fluctuation summary around super bowl commercial mentions

Clicking through to that top mention from E! News, we see a piece sharing teasers from Super Bowl commercial top contenders, including Sabra’s (and the Super Bowl’s) first ever drag queen commercial:

first ever drag queen super bowl commercial

The ad is being called revolutionary even. “For queer audiences, it is an art form and an ‘outsiders’ language,” Witek said of drag. “Reaching the Super Bowl means taking our language into every home in the nation and millions around the world.”

“The Super Bowl is the ultimate test, when you can take chances like this and realize that the fear of drag is nothing people imagined it to be,” he said. “It’s us telling our own joke about ourselves, with a sense of humor and authenticity … with luck, everyone laughs with us.”

And if that wasn’t enough to get tongues wagging about Sabra, we’ll be seeing a ‘sit down’ with Real Housewives of New Jersey, Teresa Giudice and Caroline Manzo as they settle their differences over hummus:

Sabra sit down with Real Housewives of New Jersey

And then what is rapper T-Pain doing? Well, he’s singing about eating hummus, of course:

TPain singing about eating hummus for sabra super bowl commercial

Will Sabra capture its sought-after buzz during the game? We’ll have to wait and see how it resonates with the football crowd, because sentiment is what sells it. And “it” can be anything online.

Right now, the interwebs are solidly #TeamSabra. The world is “ready” for change and followers are “excited.” And if they can accomplish this about hummus, imagine what your brand can do?

positive word cloud around Sabras super bowl commercial

There’s a good bit of positive sentiment surrounding these Super Bowl commercials just in general right now, and one clever commercial in particular is standing out . . .

Super Bowl Commercial Sentiment

Positive sentiment can change in an instant if something shifts, but things look good as of this writing. Searching top terms and top emotions bears this out:

Searching top terms and top emotions for super bowl commercial sentiment

So, what is being labeled a “great cause” and which ad is capturing this overwhelmingly positive support? They’re not one and the same ad, FYI – and neither is the most buzzworthy (in the moment) ad of all!

Exploring “Authors” posting about this “great cause” not only tells us what they’re tweeting about, but also who these top tweeters are. So, Oil of Olay wins kudos for its “great cause” – the girl power ad about female astronauts. Supporting girls in STEM is admirable, and so it the amount of conversation they’ve garnered.

And Olay also wins the influencer marketing game (or they could, at least) by capturing a list of these social media movers and shakers and then harnessing that goodwill to enlist their support when the next campaign comes around:

Oil of Olay authors tweeting about super bowl commercial

And it’s also handy to have influential types on your side when things go awry. Influencers and brand ambassadors are the best assets a business can have online for a multitude of reasons, assuming they’re relevant to a brand’s niche. And assuming they understand the art of conversation online.

A brand isn’t a silo after all! Though Budweiser seems able to consistently hit its target with incredibly on-point advertising . . . so, it’s probably no surprise that the brand that has seriously captured hearts of consumers is Budweiser for its “typical American” tv spot:

Budweiser capturing lion's share of positive sentiment

 

In it, Budweiser captured complaints people have about “typical Americans” and turned them upside down, showing the strength of each trait.

Typical American commercial

Odds are strong that this one may resonate pretty perfectly.

Reach out and we’ll make sure your brand sorts sentiment in a way that gives you the intel you need, right when you need it. And that applies to post-Super Bowl marketing tactics too!